The likelihood of your teen son watching porn is very high

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In the UK the average age of a young boys exposure to online pornography is 11 years old. In a recent survey 81% of 3000 boys said that they look at it.

A new book by Deana Puccio deals with this and other issues for parents in the digital. Top of the list of major concerns is the access to technology and after that the ubiquity of online pornography.

“There is a risk to this generation that online pornography could damage the sexual sensitivities of boys and their future relationships,” said Deana.  “However, girls, who are far less likely to be interested in pornography at this stage in their lives, are at risk too, from their partners and future partners who could mistake the fiction of online pornography to be the norms when it comes to having normal, satisfying sex”.

Growing up, expectations need to be realistic. The vast majority of women in pornographic films have surgically enhanced breasts and no pubic hair. By normalising such things, pornography could be conditioning boys to have unrealistic expectations.

Porn is having an impact on they way boys interact and react and conversate with / about girls their own age. Sexist, misogynistic, homophobic and racist language and attitudes are common. In the book, Deana list the kinds of everyday sexism boys use and girls overhear: “On her knees, that’s where she belongs”; “I would destroy her”; “She’s a f*ck and chuck.”

What needs to be done to combat this?

LYP says: We fear that the impact of pornography is having epidemic affect on young people’s lives. It normalises sex on such degrading level that it’s only a matter of time that society will hit a tipping point, unless schools, governments and parents start taking this seriously. Recent studies from the Women and Equalities Commision have stated that a third of all girls in schools have been sexually harassed. This is only the tip of the iceberg. That is why LYP is trying to visit schools and warn young people of the dangers of online pornography. Join us by speaking to your local secondary school about their code of practice and how they combat sexual harassment and whether it’s being used effectively.  

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